Jeffery Marshall

Jeffery Marshall

Jeffery is a Guitar instructor at JamPlay.com

Jeffery Marshall has been a staple of the L.A. music scene for more than 30 years. Jeff left his humble upbringings in Northern Michigan to attend Hollywood's own Musicians Institute in 1989. Upon graduating, he played in a variety of bands, one of which included Hardware featuring Tod Howarth of Frehley's Comet, Ted Nugent and Cheap Trick fame. Jeff has gone on to tour with artists such as prog rock legend Alan Parsons and American Idol runner-up Bo Bice, as well as various ... (more)

Jeffery currently offers 147 guitar lessons at JamPlay, with 147 intermediate lessons.

Jeffery Marshall's contribution to JamPlay

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Theory and Improvisation

Inside and Out: A Guide to Fretboard Mastery

Have you reached a point in your playing where having greater knowledge of the fretboard is paramount for your progress? If so, this lesson series is for you! Musicians Institute instructor Jeff Marshall provides a bottom up approach to learning the entirety of the fretboard using the basic CAGED system

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Series Introduction

Welcome to Inside and Out with Jeff Marshall! In this lesson series, Jeff takes a bottom up approach to fret board proficiency. Using the CAGED system, he builds off of familiar open chord shapes to unlock the fretboard for not only chords, but arpeggio's scales and the beginnings of solo and improvisation. If you're looking for a better handle on the fretboard, this is the lesson series for you!

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Major Triad Chord shapes in CAGED

To get started off with the series, Jeff discusses how the CAGED system is used, then goes over the major chord shapes in that system. This lesson and the rest of the course will be taught in the key of D.

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Major Triad Arpeggios in CAGED

Now that you know the basic triad chord shapes in the CAGED system, you can now start adding triad arpeggios on top of those shapes. Jeff Marshall shows you how!

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Major Pentatonic in 5 CAGED Boxes

The next step in the learning process is to take the triad arpeggios you previously learned and apply them to the Major Pentatonic patterns in the CAGED boxes.

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Major Scale in 5 CAGED Boxes

Now that you have the major pentatonic under your fingers, we add two additional notes to create a full major scale in the associated CAGED boxes.

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Extended Major Pentatonic Scale

Now that you have the full major scale under your fingers, Jeff takes a step back and get's a bit outside of CAGED for this lesson. Depending on the situation, you may find it necessary to step out of bounds to player more comfortably or in a stylistic manner. Jeff discusses the possibilities that knowing the full major scale patterns open up for major pentatonic playing.

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Major CAGED Application

You've learned the major CAGED shapes bottom up from triads, through the Pentatonic. It's now time to apply that material in musical form.

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Minor Triad Chord Shapes in CAGED

Now that you've got the basic major shapes under your fingers, Jeff is going to handle the same training for minor, starting with triad shapes.

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Minor Triad Arpeggios in CAGED

Now that you know the basic minor chord shapes in CAGED, it's time to take a step up the rung to the minor chord arpeggios.

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Minor Pentatonic Shapes in CAGED

With the triad and arpeggios shapes under your fingers, Jeff now teaches the minor pentatonic shapes in CAGED, using the key of D.

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Minor Scale in 5 CAGED boxes

It's now time to take a look at the entire minor scale in the 5 boxes that comprise the CAGED system.

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Extended Minor Pentatonic

Just like with the major scale, Jeff will now go through the process of discussing the extended minor pentatonic scale in the CAGED system.

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Minor CAGED Application

Just like before with the major tonalities, it's time to apply what you've learned about the minor CAGED system to musical form.

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Scale Harmony

Many guitarists start with learning chords, before scales, but logically, chords come from scales. In lesson 14, Jeff teaches the major scale pattern across the neck and discusses harmonizing it in diads and triad chords.

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Diminished Triad Chord in CAGED

In the previous lesson, Jeff introduced a harmonized major scale and with it, the diminished chord. In this lesson he goes deeper into that chord and teaches its chord shapes in the CAGED system.

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Diatonic Root Position Triads

Continuing on with learning to harmonize the major scale, Jeff takes a look at root position triads in different string groupings.

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Diatonic 1st Inversion Triads

In this lesson, you'll take the same knowledge you learned in lesson 16 and change your shapes to give you the 1st inversion diatonic triads of the major scale.

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Diatonic 2nd Inversion Triads

The last set of triad types in the harmonized major scale are the 2nd inversion triads.

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Diatonic Triad Application

Now that you've learned how to harmonize the major scale with diads and all three triad types, on different string groupings, it's time to apply that knowledge in a musical way.

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Major 7th Chords in CAGED

It's now time to start looking at 7th chords as part of the inside and out system using CAGED. Jeff starts with a look at the Major 7th voicings.

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Dominant 7th Chords in CAGED

Now that you know the major 7th chords in the CAGED system, it's time to get the dominant 7th chords under your fingers.

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Minor 7th Chords in CAGED

Moving along with 7th chord voicings, lesson 22 is all about minor 7th chords.

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Minor 7b5 Chords in CAGED

In lesson 23 Jeff offers up another look at 7th chord voicings. This time you'll be learning the minor 7b5 voicings in the CAGED system.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Scales Pattern 1

Now that you know all of the chord voicings for the various 7th chords, it's time to start taking a look at the scale patterns derived from these shapes.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Scales Pattern 2

In lesson 25 you'll learn the second pattern diatonic 7th chord scale.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Scales Pattern 3

In lesson 26 Jeff shows you the pattern 3 diatonic 7th chord scale.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Scales Pattern 4

In lesson 27 you'll be learning pattern for of the diatonic 7th chord scale.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Scales Pattern 5

Lesson 28 shows you the 5th and final pattern, diatonic scale around the 7th chords.

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Harmonic Organization

In this lesson Jeff offers up some supplemental concepts in relation to how harmonic information can be organized.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Arpeggios Pattern 1

Just like the 7th chord scales gone over previously, Jeff will now be walking you through the arpeggio patterns in CAGED, starting with pattern 1.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Arpeggios Pattern 2

Jeff moves on to pattern 2 of the diatonic 7th chord arpeggios.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Arpeggios Pattern 3

Jeff moves on to pattern 3 of the 7th chord diatonic arpeggios.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Arpeggios Pattern 4

Jeff moves on to pattern 4 of the diatonic 7th chord arpeggios.

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Diatonic 7th Chord Arpeggios Pattern 5

Jeff moves on to the 5th and final pattern of the diatonic 7th chord arpeggios.

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Arpeggio Organization

As he did with harmonic content, Jeff goes over organization techniques for the diatonic 7th chord arpeggios.

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Overall Application

Jeff wraps up his Inside and Out series by providing guidance and insight into how to take all the individual chunks of information and apply them to your playing.

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Theory and Improvisation

Creative Control

Creative Control with Jeffery Marshall picks up where his series Inside and Out leaves off. Now that you have the fundamental knowledge of chord, arpeggio, and scale construction across the neck of the guitar, how do you move that conceptual knowledge into practical application? Creative Control discusses concepts and techniques like pentatonic and chord substitution, blues phrasing, motifs, and hybrid picking. When combined you'll have the ability to take your knowledge of the fretboard and translate it into memorable musical passages.

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Creative Control Introduction

Jeffery Marshall is back with another deep dive into creativity through technique and concept. Building on his series Inside and Out, Jeffery takes a practical look at taking basic fretboard and skill knowledge and transferring it into the realm of musicality.

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Good Cop, Bad Cop - Part 1

One of the first steps to learning to lead or solo involves playing in boxes or scale positions. In the lead-off lesson in this series, Jeffery talks about getting out of the box and combining tonalities over the blues.

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Good Cop, Bad Cop - Part 2

In part 2 of the good cop, bad cop context, Jeffery looks at taking that idea and using it over chord changes.

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Good Cop, Bad Cop - Part 3

To avoid sounding "hokey" in a blues setting where major chords are being used, Jeffery talks about using minor tonalities over major V chords.

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Pentatonic Substitution - Part 1

Now it's time to look at substituting pentatonic scales to create a new and different feeling.

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Pentatonic Substitution - Part 2

In part 2 of pentatonic substitution learning, Jeffery talks about how all of the major and minor chords of a key are relative to each other, helping you nail down what pentatonic scales will work for different chords is a diatonic setting.

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Pentatonic Substitution - Part 3

In the next lesson cover pentatonic substitutions, Jeffery discusses creating outside sounds using pentatonic scales over chords you may not have thought about.

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Chord Substitution - Part 1

Starting in lesson 8, Jeffery discusses rhythm guitar and spicing up your rhythm playing through chord substitutions.

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Chord Substitution - Part 2

In part 2 of chord substitution, you'll be substituting triads over major 7 chords.

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Chord Substitution - Part 3

In the final segment dedicated to chord substitution, you'll be using triads over minor 7 chords.

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Modal Chords - Part 1

In the next section of rhythm learning, Jeff discusses the concept of modal chords and harmonizing scales.

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Modal Chords - Part 2

In part 2 of the modal chords section, Jeffery discusses modal chords in a context of a 12 bar blues.

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Modal Chords - Part 3

In lesson 13, Jeffery discusses being able to use the same modal chord voicings against various key signatures or tonal centers with a backing track.

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Modal Chords - Part 4

Continuing on with the concept of modal chords, in lesson 14 you're now going to also start modifying the triads you're using.

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Modal Chords - Part 5

Now that you're familiar with altering basic triads, let's take that a step further and look at quartal harmony.

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Modal Chords - Part 6

Closing out this section on modal chords, you'll use all of the techniques discussed and demonstrated by Jeffery over a backing track.

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Blues Phrasing - Part 1

Next up in the Creative Control series is a look at phrasing. In part 1 you'll specifically look at the concept of space.

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Blues Phrasing - Part 2

Continuing to build off the concepts of the last lesson, you'll move your phrasing behind the downbeat and let the band speak first.

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Blues Phrasing - Part 3

In lesson 19, Jeffery discusses the concept of repetition in phrasing. Mixed with the concepts from the previous two lessons, this can further help shape the feel you want in your blues phrasing.

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The Motif Part 1: Melody

In this lesson, Jeffery discusses the concept of a motif, specifically as a melody. This concept will help you get out of playing lick-based lead and solo lines.

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The Motif Part 2: Rhythms

Just like using a melodic approach to a motif, you can apply the same concept to rhythms. In lesson 21, Jeffery shows you how!

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The Motif Part 3: Accents

Now, let's jazz up the concept of a motif even further by adding accents.

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Odd Grouping Part 1: 3 Against 4

The next tool in your creative control arsenal is the idea of odd groupings against an even feel. This technique keeps the listener on their toes and can create some really cool stumbling effects in your playing. Jeffery will start by dissecting groups of three, against four.

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Odd Grouping Part 2: 5 Against 4

Let's continue our look at odd groupings over even feel with the next set, five against four.

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Odd Grouping Part 3: 7 Against 4

Now the last set of odd groupings over an even feel, seven against four.

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Hybrid Picking Part 1: Rhythm

Hybrid picking gives you more options for playing style versus a pick, or even fingers alone. In the next several lessons Jeffery will break down the style into different components, starting with Rhythm.

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Hybrid Picking Part 2: Rhythm - The Claw

Lesson 27 takes a look at a specific rhythm technique for hybrid picking called "the claw"

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Hybrid Picking Part 3: Soloing

Hybrid picking can add some flare and dynamics to your solos as well by allowing you to quickly accent individual notes that wouldn't necessarily be possible with a pick.

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Hybrid Picking Part 4: String Skipping

Additionally, hybrid picking makes string skipping and the wide intervals that go along with it a bit easier to accomplish.

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Hybrid Picking Part 5: Psycho Speed

Mixed with hammer-on and pull-off techniques, hybrid picking has the ability to incredibly increase the speed at which you can play. To wrap up this series, Jeffery shows you how.

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Blues

Legends of Blues Rock: Learn Their Tricks

What do Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Chuck Berry, Jeff Beck, Keith Richards, Albert King, Joe Perry, Duane Allman, have in common? They all played with feeling, invented a signature guitar sound, and their phrasing and lick techniques became legendary. This course will help you learn to incorporate the signature techniques of the masters into your sound and take your guitar playing to the next level.

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Introduction to: Legends of Blues Rock: Learn their Tricks

Jeffery Marshall introduces us to: "Legends of Blues Rock: Learn their Tricks"

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Chuck Berry

Let's get the course underway with the man who started it all - Mr. Chuck Berry. In this lesson, Jeffery will discuss the "baked-in" performance aspects of Chuck's playing that would go on to inspire generations of players.

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Albert King

Living up to his namesake, Albert King established himself as a preeminent Bluesman of his era. Here, Jeffery will discuss the techniques that set King apart from his contemporaries including his use of the "riff", which was a departure from the traditional 12-bar Blues.

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Keith Richards

While he's not the flashiest player on our list, Keith Richards has made his mark with his swagger and style. In this lesson, Jeffery will discuss key aspects of Keith's playing including his use of open tunings.

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Jimi Hendrix

Not many players are as synonymous with the electric guitar as Jimi Hendrix. Arguably one of the best to ever pick up the instrument, Jimi's techniques could cover an entire course. Here, Jeffery will discuss a couple of the techniques that helped create the legendary sound such as thumb-over neck chord manipulation and stacked fifths!

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Eric Clapton

Eric Clapton carved out his legacy during a time of guitar playing revolution. Let's join Jeffery as he discusses a few of Eric's 'bread and butter" skills that helped define one of the most recognizable sounds in Blues and Rock.

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Robin Trower

After the tragic early passing of Jimi Hendrix, few players were able to step in and fill the void as well as Robin Trower. In this lesson, Jeffery will cover a few of the techniques that allowed Robin to pick up the mantle, including his use of chord embellishments via sixths, and his trademark Uni-vibe sound.

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Duane Allman Slide Guitar

In his short time, Duane Allman single-handedly created the quintessential slide guitar sound that influenced a generation. Here, Jeffery will cover a few of the key skills that helped Duane develop his trademark sound.

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Dickey Betts

Often overshadowed by the talent and loss of Duane Allman, Dickey Betts had a unique approach and laid-back feel that proved to be the perfect complementary fit for the Allman's classic sound.

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Jeff Beck: Part 1

Few players have turned the instrument of electric guitar on its head more than Jeff Beck. His revolutionary use of the floating tremolo or "whammy" bar pushed the electric guitar into new sonic territory. Let's follow Jeffery as he covers a few of the unique skills from this maverick player.

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Jeff Beck: Part 2

Continuing our exploration of Jeff Beck, here Jeffery will discuss some of the more percussive tremolo techniques that made Jeff Beck one of the all-time greats!

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Train Kept A-Rollin'

We all have that one go-to favorite guitar solo! In this lesson, Jeffery covers one of the solos that helped set his course on electric guitar, the classic: "Train Kept a Rollin".

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Billy Gibbons

Time to head on down to that Texas town! The swagger of Texas Blues abounds as Jeffery covers some of the signature sounds of Billy Gibbons, who brought a harder edge to traditional Blues that helped bring the genre to a more mainstream rock audience.

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'Messin' with the Kid'

Here is a take on a foundational Blues song that set the course for the genre. "Messin' with the Kid" was originally recorded by Junior Wells, and featured the legendary Buddy Guy on guitar!

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Ritchie Blackmore

Ritchie Blackmore was a key player in moving the Blues into the arena of Rock. With the use of his trademark inverted root 5th chords he used the Blues to create such legendary songs as "Smoke on the Water" and "Highway Star". Let's join Jeffery as he covers a few of Ritchie's key techniques.

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David Gilmour

David Gilmour may not be known as a player with particularly blinding speed or flashy technique, but he is known for being one of the deepest and most emotional players of his time. With his precise soulful bending and phrasing that tugs at emotions, his playing has stood the test of time and is a rite of passage for players and music enthusiasts to this day! In this lesson, Jeffery will flesh out a few of the techniques behind some of David's most iconic solos.

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Frank Marino

One of the more "under the radar" players on our list is the great Frank Marino. With his band "Mahogany Rush", he helped to maintain a touch of the psychedelic Hendrix-era playing with his use of octave shapes and minor pentatonic licks to inspire many current players such as Zakk Wylde, Paul Gilbert, and Joe Bonamassa.

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Stevie Ray Vaughan

Stevie Ray Vaughan. This monster from Texas' reputation proceeds him. In his short time, he and his band 'Double Trouble' managed to bring a more traditional Texas Blues sound to the radio waves, but with a more aggressive swagger stemming from the way that Stevie would attack his instrument!

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19

Gary Moore

During his career, Gary Moore managed to span the full genre spectrum. Starting with his first bands 'Skid Row' and 'Thin Lizzy', he went on to cover everything from the Blues to Hard Rock to Fusion. Here, Jeffery will dissect a few of Gary's key licks that he used to ascend and descend the full fretboard!

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Jimmy Page

James Patrick Page ascended directly from his Blues roots in his first band, The Yardbirds, to form one of the most iconic bands in the history of music - the mighty Led Zeppelin. In this lesson, Jeffery will take a look at some of the techniques that are central to the sound that has, and will continue to be, an influence on musicians and music enthusiasts alike.

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Robben Ford

In this lesson, Jeffery will dive into a few of the skills that have allowed Robben Ford to collaborate with some of the most iconic names in music. Over the years he has been a pivotal influence, opening up players to a more sophisticated sound of blues.

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Joe Walsh

Aside from the time spent with the iconic band, The Eagles - Joe Walsh has fostered a successful solo career while also becoming a prolific session player for some of the biggest names in music. Here, Jeffery will show a few of the laid-back and soulful techniques that have helped curate Joe's signature sound.

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Angus Young

Angus Young has brought us his brash, hard rock-infused blues for decades now. AC/DC's use of simple open "cowboy chords" to lay down thick, rocking foundations has allowed for his high octane soloing and showmanship. In this lesson, Jeffery will dissect a few of the skills that have been key to Angus' playing.

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Current Pentatonic Masters

Here, Jeffery will bring us into the modern era to touch on a few of the skills incorporated by current blues masters, Joe Bonamassa, Eric Gales, and Eric Johnson to create a faster style of pentatonic playing.

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Three Takes

To close out the course, Jeffery will take a popular E Dorian lick and look at it through the lens of three iconic Bluesmen: Stevie Ray Vaughan, Joe Bonamassa, and Michael Landau.

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Rock

30 Savage Rock Licks You Must Know

30 Savage Rock Licks You Must Know is a collection of 30 fast and shred based licks that fit easily into many rock genres. The licks span sub-genre's of rock from plus to metal and feature techniques like sweeping and hybrid picking to produce blazing fast speeds.

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30 Savage Rock Licks You Must Know Introduction

Jeffery Marshall returns to JamPlay to offer up a set of rock vocabulary sure to impress your friends. Using the backing tracks from his courses Next Level Pentatonics, as well as his Modern Blues and Rock genre study, these licks add practical vocabulary to those teachings.

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Rock Repeats

To get things started, Jeff offers up a repeating shreddy pentatonic lick.

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Bluesy Shred

This lick is more complex and uses a "quasi" blues scale sequence to get its point across.

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Pentatonic Shred

Lick 3 shreds on another Pentatonic scale.

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Hybrid Sidestepping

Lick 5 is a sidestepping shred lick using the hybrid picking technique

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Stacked Arpeggios

Lick 5 is a sweeping arpeggio lick using several arpeggio shapes.

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Stacks of 5

Using the concept from the previous lick, Jeff offers up some vocabulary with stacked arpeggios, this time in groups of five.

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Altered Pentatonic Shred

This shred lick uses a flat 5 minor pentatonic altered sound to blow your face apart.

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Hybrid Shred

Lick 8 is another shred lick using the Hybrid Picking technique.

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10

Bluesy 5's

This lick uses the minor blues scale and a healthy dose of alternate picking to blow up the blues.

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Dorian Madness

Lick 10 in E Dorian is a descending scaler lick that shows off its parent mode.

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12

Triad 5's

This lick is a descending triad lick in G Lydian that uses groupings of five.

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13

Pedal Tone Side Stepping

Lick 12 is another sidestepping lick that also uses a pedal tone.

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14

Blues Scale Sweeping

In this lick, you'll use the sweep technique along with the blues scale to create a bluesy rock vibe.

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15

Diminished Returns

This blazing lick incorporates string skipping along with the diminished scale.

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16

Super Mario

Lick 15 is a triangular ascent across the fretboard using groupings of five.

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17

D Mixolydian Swamp Rock Part 1

Lick 16 is part 1 of a swamp rock-inspired lick in D Mixolydian.

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D Mixolydian Swamp Rock Part 2

Let's pick up where we left off with lick 16 and learn part 2 of the whole part.

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D Mixolydian Swamp Rock Part 3

Now let's learn the final part of this Swamp Rock lick and put it all together.

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Liquid Legato

Lick 19 is a blazing melodic lick utilizing the left-hand legato technique.

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Triad Sequence

Next up is a sequence-based lick using triads.

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22

Cm Sequence

Lick 21 is another group of four sequence-based licks, this time in C minor.

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23

Clean Your Cell

This lick uses a 1-3-2 cell in the key of C minor to produce a bit of a falling down effect.

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Linear Intervals

Lick 23 uses wide interval spacing in the key of E Dorian.

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Mixolydian Triad Pairs

Here's another triad pair lick using the Mixolydian mode.

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26

The Lukather

The Lukather is part blues, part chromatic, and all cool.

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String Skipping

The name is all you need for lick 26! Jeff offers up a string skipping lick that utilizes groups of 5.

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E Dorian #4

Here's another lick in the E Dorian mode.

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Pent Up Pentatonics

Channel your inner 80's metal head with this pentatonic riff-based lick.

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Slip Sliding Pentatonics

Like 29 is an E minor pentatonic tonality wrapped around an E Dorian track, to really create an outside mood.

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String Skipping 7’s

To round out this lick pack, Jeffery offers up a string skipping lick in groups of 7.

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Theory and Improvisation

Next Level Pentatonics

Mastery of the pentatonic scale is an essential skill for any serious guitarist. But relying on simple major and minor pentatonic scales can get old fast. In this exciting course, veteran guitarist Jeff Marshall uses simple techniques to take your usage of pentatonic scales to the next level. If you're looking to expand your knowledge of music theory and learn some incredible new lead and solo ideas, this course is perfect for you.

1

Course Introduction

Join Jeff Marshall in this intensive new course that will take your knowledge of pentatonic scales to the next level.

3:41 Runtime

0.0 Difficulty

2

Pentatonic Sequences and Phrases

Before we can get into complex pentatonic substitutions, let's start with some simple phrases, sequences, and patterns based on our classic minor pentatonic.

19:12 Runtime

3.5 Difficulty

3

The Mighty Minor Pentatonic - Part 1

We take a look at using different minor pentatonic shapes to create a modal sound over a minor root chord.

15:39 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

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4

The Mighty Minor Pentatonic - Part 2

Building on the previous lesson, we learn to apply minor pentatonic shapes over a major chord.

14:52 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

5

Pentatonic Substitution Strategies

We dive deeper into different pentatonic shapes and their relation to the CAGED system.

13:56 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

6

Altered Pentatonic Substitution

Using simple pentatonic substitution, we learn how to get some very complex and modern sounds when playing over a simple 2-5-1 turnaround.

16:20 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

7

The “John Coltrane” Pentatonic

We learn a simple variation on the minor pentatonic shape to give us even more tonal possibilities.

15:05 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

8

Move the Root!

By simply moving the root of our pentatonic scale by a whole note, we can achieve unique and complex sounds quickly and easily.

15:41 Runtime

3.5 Difficulty

9

Sidestepping!

We take the concept of the previous lesson and apply it in a different context by moving our pentatonic scale around in half-note increments.

16:46 Runtime

4.5 Difficulty

10

Mixolydian Pentatonics

We learn another simple pentatonic variation, this time focusing on outlining the dominant or Mixolydian scale.

14:44 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

11

Mixolydian to Lydian

By moving our dominant pentatonic shape over our root chord, we can lend a hip and modern Lydian sound to our playing.

12:07 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

12

Imply the “5”

We discuss how to imply the sound of the 5 chord using a substituted pentatonic scale.

14:07 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

13

Minor b5 Pentatonics

By flatting the fifth of our minor pentatonic, we can achieve a hip diminished sound that's ideal for bluesy soloing.

13:52 Runtime

3.5 Difficulty

14

Dominant Sound with the Minor b5 Pentatonic

We learn another cool use case for our minor b5 pentatonic - creating a unique dominant sound when used over a major chord.

14:41 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

15

Minor b5 Pentatonic Over the 2 Chord

We combine several different pentatonic substitution strategies to create a hip and modern sound when playing over a 2-5-1 turnaround.

15:41 Runtime

4.5 Difficulty

16

Lydian Sound with the Minor b5 Pentatonic

We use the minor b5 pentatonic to achieve a Lydian sound.

14:28 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

17

Dorian Sound with the Minor b5 Pentatonic

We continue to explore the versatility of the minor b5 pentatonic, this time by using it to achieve a Dorian minor sound.

13:56 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

18

Altered Sound with the Minor b5 Pentatonic

We find yet another application for the minor b5 pentatonic, this time using to imply an altered sound over a 2-5-1.

15:35 Runtime

4.5 Difficulty

19

Bebop Blues Pentatonic

We learn a hip 'bebop' pentatonic shape that gives our playing a funky and unique sound.

14:59 Runtime

3.5 Difficulty

20

Diminished Pentatonics

Our next pentatonic scale is based on the diminished scale. We learn the shape and compare and contrast it to the full scale.

18:20 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

21

Imply the 5 with a Diminished Pentatonic

We use our diminished pentatonic to imply a 5 chord over a static vamp, while also practicing our phrasing.

11:56 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

22

Diminished Pentatonic 'Secret Weapon'

By simply moving our diminished pentatonic, we can achieve a unique and hip sound that pushes the ear in interesting ways.

15:29 Runtime

4.0 Difficulty

23

Whole Tone Pentatonic

We learn a new pentatonic sequence based on the whole-tone scale.

17:20 Runtime

4.5 Difficulty

24

Imply the 5 with a Whole Tone Pentatonic

We use the whole-tone pentatonic shape to imply the 5 over a vamping groove.

13:56 Runtime

4.5 Difficulty

25

Augmented Pentatonics

We take our whole-tone pentatonic shape and translate it into an augmented triad shape. We then apply this shape over a more complex chord form.

18:26 Runtime

4.5 Difficulty

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